Do I Need To Provide Meals During Residential Treatment?

Do I Need To Provide Meals During Residential Treatment?

One of the most often overlooked issues with addiction is a poor diet.  Even those without addiction pay their diet little to no attention unless they are told by a doctor that they are at risk for diabetes, heart disease, or other ailments.  Many people with substance abuse issues will find themselves relying on their drug of choice to relieve any physical or emotional discomfort they may experience from a poor diet.  Your recovery will require will require lifestyle changes to be made that go beyond just stopping the use of drugs and alcohol.  During your recovery, you may start to experience some of the poor diet symptoms that you were able to temporarily relieve with your drug of choice.  Having your meals prepared by a professional while you are in treatment can help in many ways:

Help ease withdrawal symptoms

Malnutrition and withdrawals can have many of the same symptoms: headaches, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue.  These shared symptoms make it difficult to distinguish between withdrawal and hunger, intensifying the perceived intensity of withdrawals.  Proper nutrition can help to not only ease the signs of malnourishment but also provide vitamins and minerals that can help ease your symptoms.

Allows you to focus on recovery

Recovering from your addiction will require complete focus and demands all of your energy.  By having each of your meals prepared by a gourmet chef, you are able to focus completely on getting better.  Part of your recovery is learning to better manage your stress and emotions.  Eliminating the need to worry about eating right, at the right times, can help ease some of that stress while you are learning your new coping skills.

You will get the nutrition your body needs

Depending on your addiction, your body may require different nutritional plans.  As a recovering alcoholic, your body may require a diet high in thiamine to make up for the vitamin’s deprivation caused by chronic alcohol consumption.  Having your meals prepared for you ensures that you will receive the nourishment needed to repair some of the physical damage caused by drug and alcohol abuse.

You will learn what a healthy diet looks like

By having your meals professionally prepared for you, you are being taught at what makes up a healthy meal.  You will get to experience food pairings you may not have tried before and you will train your body to want healthy foods with every meal.  These eating habits can carry on outside of treatment and help you to maintain a healthy diet long after you leave.

 

Detox is the first step in the journey to recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the way we approach detox and treat those who are detoxing. Our comfortable environment, encouraging program, and engaging amenities set us apart from other detox centers. Call us today for information:  (844) 325-9168

5 Ways to Pass the Time in Detox

5 Ways to Pass the Time in Detox

Detox may last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on what’s in your system and how long you have been using. You will definitely have some down time. How you spend that time depends to some extent on how bad your symptoms are. Lying in bed may be the most you can do. Eventually, you’ll be able to manage a bit more, and that’s when the boredom starts.

If you feel like you need to do something to pass the time, what that is depends on your facility. Different facilities have different rules and different amenities. Some facilities even restrict reading material, lest something you read tempts you back into old habits. Some facilities may offer many different activities, which they will tell you about. Here are some things you can do on your own to make the time in detox pass a little more quickly.

Watch movies or TV. This is half a step up from lying in bed. If you’re feeling just well enough to be bored, you can probably keep your eyes open and stare at a screen. If you still feel pretty bad–and you have any choice in the matter–go for something simple or familiar that doesn’t demand too much concentration. When you feel a little better, watch something a little more demanding.

Read. There’s almost always something to read, even if it’s the Big Book of AA. Reading demands a little more concentration than watching TV, but there’s still plenty of range in difficulty, from flipping through People magazine to reading The Canterbury Tales. You may want to choose something inspiring or comforting–think Victor Frankl or AA Milne, not Sartre or Dostoyevsky. Or you might prefer a spiritual text.

Draw. It’s easy to get a pen and paper. You can doodle or draw whatever is in your room or outside your window. You can draw 10 self-portraits a day and see how they change. If you’re “not artistic,” it doesn’t really matter. Detox is a time for new beginnings. This is a good time to start trying new things without judging yourself for not being good right away.

Write. Writing during detox may actually be very good for you. You don’t have to be Tolstoy; you can start by recording your progression of symptoms. “Woke up at eight with headache and slight nausea.” It doesn’t have to be more than that and it might help your doctors assess your treatment. Also, studies show that writing can help you better deal with difficult situations. Writing down, as specifically as possible, what you’re going through can make you feel more in control of your feelings and reduce stress.

Do puzzles. Any kind of puzzle will do–jigsaw puzzle, Rubik’s cube, sudoku, crossword puzzles, etc. Not only do these pass the time, but they require a certain amount of focus. The more you focus on the puzzle, the less you notice your symptoms.

Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the approach to detox. Our comfortable environment is designed to support the detox process while helping each client recognize their human dignity in recovery. Detox is the first step in recovery. Start your journey to wellness today by calling us for information:  (844) 325-9168

Are You Missing Conversations About Detox Due to Slang?

Are You Missing Conversations About Detox Due to Slang?

Addiction is another world which comes with it’s own dictionary of vocabulary. You might be missing critical clues that your loved one is addicted. In addition to physical and behavioral signs of addiction, one of the best places to identify substance abuse is in the way your loved one talks. If they are hiding their addiction, they will not likely talk to you directly about entering a phase of detox. However, you might catch a text or a phone conversation where you hear unfamiliar slang. Primarily, these terms will refer to being sick or under the weather. However, the right term, like “DT’s” could indicate a higher level of concern regarding detox. Knowing these terms could be the difference between life or death if a loved one decides to hide their withdrawals at home.

Asian Flu: One source claims this is a common term for the flu-like symptoms of opioid withdrawal. It might stem from opium withdrawal, hence “Asian flu” and not some other kind of flu.

Cold Turkey: quitting suddenly without a gradual reduction in dosage. Cold turkey is the fastest way to detox and might not be too bad if you receive medication to treat withdrawal symptoms.

Dope Sick, or Dopesick: originally meant nausea specific to heroin withdrawal, but is used more generally for opiate withdrawal and is sometimes used for other drugs. Dopesickness can make it hard to drink enough water and eat while detoxing, which can make detox more painful and dangerous.

Drying out: quitting alcohol

DTs: delirium tremens, severe alcohol withdrawal resulting in shaking or seizures. The DTs are among the most dangerous withdrawal symptoms, fatal in three to five percent of cases. DTs usually require medication to prevent seizures.

Kicking: detoxing, trying to quit. One might think this derives from kicking something away, but probably derives from the kicking and flailing of heroin addicts suffering withdrawal.

The Shakes: tremors associated with alcohol or opiate withdrawal. The shakes can be an early symptom of alcohol withdrawal, appearing within a few hours, or a moderate to severe symptom of alcohol or opiate withdrawal.

The Sweats: sweating associated with many kinds of withdrawal, including opioids and alcohol

Tapering: not slang exactly. Tapering refers to gradually reducing dosage, usually of opioids, to lessen the severity of withdrawal.

 

Detox is the first step in the journey to recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the way we approach detox and treat those who are detoxing. Our comfortable environment, encouraging program, and engaging amenities set us apart from other detox centers. Call us today for information:  (844) 325-9168

5 Ways Massage Therapy Supports Detox

5 Ways Massage Therapy Supports Detox

The meat and potatoes of detox includes medication, counselling, rest, and patience. Your body has to make big adjustments in a short time. Massage therapy is a complementary therapy that may help make detox more comfortable and speed your recovery.

Massage therapy is often lumped with alternative therapies whose benefits are hard to prove, but for someone in detox, massage therapy is excellent complement to regular treatment. According to the Mayo Clinic, massage therapy can help with many conditions including headaches, insomnia, anxiety, pain, and injuries. It can also produce “feelings of caring, comfort, and connection.” All of these factors can be important during detox.

Detox is, above all, stressful. Your body is stressed by withdrawal symptoms and your mind is stressed by discomfort, insomnia, and facing an uncertain future. Massage therapy is perfect for stress relief. It loosens your muscles and helps you relax. If you are detoxing from stimulants you may have gotten used to holding an incredible amount of tension in your muscles without even noticing. Therapeutic massage can relax those muscles and remind you what normal feels like.

Relaxation is especially important because anxiety is a common withdrawal symptom of any drug. In detox, anxiety is usually treated with medication. Massage therapy is a good complement to anti-anxiety medication because people respond differently to medication and even people who don’t get as much relief from medication might still benefit from a different modality.

Therapeutic massage also helps relieve pain. This is especially important if you are detoxing from heroin or prescription painkillers because muscle and bone pain are common withdrawal symptoms. If you are detoxing from these drugs, massage may be a good way to reduce the pain of withdrawal.

If you are detoxing from opioids, or even alcohol, you may have injuries that you haven’t even noticed. You should definitely tell your massage therapist about any injuries you know about. Massage may help ease the pain of the injury and help it heal more quickly.

Finally, a good massage can improve your sense of wellbeing. Problems seem more manageable when you’re relaxed. Massage also creates a feeling of social connection. People need physical contact to be emotionally healthy. Not only does getting a massage show you want to take care of yourself, but it shows someone else wants to take care of you too. Even the best medical care can feel a bit perfunctory, especially when the staff is busy. Someone spending 10 or 15 working out a knot in your back can really boost your feelings of gratitude.

Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the approach to detox. Our comfortable environment is designed to support the detox process while helping each client recognize their human dignity in recovery. Detox is the first step in recovery. Start your journey to wellness today by calling us for information:  (844) 325-9168

Do You Know Your Communication Style?

Do You Know Your Communication Style?

Effective communication is an integral part of your addiction recovery.  Proper communication is the only way to ensure that needs are clear and can be met.  Communication skills could be one of the most important skills you will learn in your recovery.  By learning how to effectively communicate your thoughts, emotions, and needs you give yourself the ability to create and grow relationships.  Many times when a person is in the midst of an addiction they tend to isolate themselves.  This isolation leads to feelings of loneliness and the need to escape into a drug induced state.  Professor Peter Cohen of New Zealand has argued that rather than referring to it as addiction, we could accurately call it bonding.  As human beings, we have a natural need for bonding.  People were not made to be isolated.  When people find themselves in a state of isolation they look for something that will give them some semblance of bonding.  This may be pornography, alcohol, cocaine, or heroin.  By learning effective communication skills we can avoid these times of isolation and increase the number of healthy human relationships we possess.  There are 3 different types of verbal communication that exist:  Aggressive, Non-Assertive, and Assertive.  

Aggressive

With aggressive communication, the focus is on changing the mind or opinion of the person we are speaking with.  Communication is often tactless or blunt and is characterized by “you” statements.

Non-Assertive

Non-assertive communication is often referred to as people pleasing.  This often leads to depression and anxiety as tensions and disdain are allowed to build until a blow up is reached.  Non-assertive communication is generally controlled by fear and inhibition.

Assertive

Assertive communication is the baby bear’s porridge when it comes to types of communication.  It is neither aggressive nor overly passive, rather it is focused on showing respect while also expressing oneself.  An assertive communication style uses “I” statements with the primary goal of expressing yourself and not trying to change others.  

By transitioning our communications with others to a more assertive style we allow for an open dialect of thoughts, ideas, and emotions.  This allows you to bond more openly with the people in your life.  By strengthening the bonds and relationships you have with others the desire for isolation will slowly fade away.  Group therapy is a great place to learn and practice these skills.

 

Detox is the first step in the journey to recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the way we approach detox and treat those who are detoxing. Our comfortable environment, encouraging program, and engaging amenities set us apart from other detox centers. Call us today for information:  (844) 325-9168

5 Steps for Breaking a Bad Habit

5 Steps for Breaking a Bad Habit

Breaking bad habits is frustrating. Sometimes your body seems stubbornly determined to continue the habit despite your best efforts. If there’s some habit you really want to break here are the steps that will increase your chances of success.

  1. Identify one habit. If you try to break more than one habit at a time, you will almost certainly fail. Identify the habit that is causing you the most trouble and internalize your reasons for breaking it. Imagine the negative consequences of continuing the habit and the positive consequences of breaking it. Try to really feel it.
  2. Notice when you’re doing the habit. Some habits are so ingrained you do them on autopilot. If you’ve ever tried to stop biting your nails for example you might have suddenly found yourself biting your nails without conscious awareness. Start by making a mental note every time you catch yourself and be sure to congratulate yourself for noticing rather than beat yourself up for slipping into the habit. Noticing means you’re improving.
  3. Spot the triggers. Habits are part of a chain of behaviors, an “if this, then that” program running somewhere deep in your nervous system. Usually, habits are triggered by stress, anxiety, or boredom. When you know what that trigger is–or triggers, since many things can cause stress, anxiety, or boredom–then you can be on guard against the habit and do something to stop it.
  4. Substitute something better. Once you’ve identified your triggers you want to think of a replacement. It’s very hard to just not do a habit. Replacing a bad habit with a good one is much easier. If stress makes you want to smoke, make a plan that when you start to feel stress. Try gum instead. It doesn’t really matter what the new habit is as long as doesn’t carry its own dangers. If you eat a cheeseburger every time you want a cigarette, you’re really just creating a different problem for yourself.  
  5. Create an environment that facilitates success. If you find yourself absentmindedly pouring a drink or or lighting a cigarette, then those things are too readily at hand. Get those temptations out of the house. The more work you have to do to engage in a habit, the less likely you are to do it unconsciously. Conversely, keep the positive replacements handy. If you really want Oreos but you would have to go all the way to the store and there are apples at home, you will probably go for the apples, even if you would really prefer the Oreos.

Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the approach to detox. Our comfortable environment is designed to support the detox process while helping each client recognize their human dignity in recovery. Detox is the first step in recovery. Start your journey to wellness today by calling us for information:  (844) 325-9168

What are the Benefits of Yoga in Recovery?

What are the Benefits of Yoga in Recovery?

Yoga is defined as a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practiced for health and relaxation. The history of yoga can be traced back over 5,000 years to the Indus-Sarasvati civilization in Northern India.  The word yoga was first mentioned in the Rig Veda, which is considered the oldest sacred text.  To some, the thought of yoga may conjure up visuals of hippies eating granola in the woods. Extensive scientific research has shown that yoga holds many positive health benefits, both mental and physical.  A regular yoga practice has been shown to:

Improve Cardiovascular Health

A study published in the Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome Journal followed 182 Chinese adults who suffered from metabolic syndrome as they practiced yoga for a year.  The activity showed to not only lower their blood pressure but also aided in a significant amount of weight being lost.

Sharpens the Brain

In a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 133 adults aged 53 to 96 who practiced yoga for only 30 minutes a day twice weekly saw a significant improvement in cognitive function.

Controls Diabetes

The yogic view of diabetes is that the body is unable to digest sugar, causing increased blood sugar levels.  The practice of yoga is believed to increase the digestive fire referred to as “Agni”.  A study published in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic research actually showed that 30 men with Type 2 diabetes who practiced yoga for six months saw a significant decrease in their blood glucose levels. This was a limited study, do not make any changes to your diabetes treatment plan without first discussing with your physician

Helps to fight off Stress and Anxiety

A report presented at the 2015 Anxiety and Depression Association of America linked yoga to lowering the levels of cortisol in women at risk for mental health problems.  The study followed 52 women between the ages of 25 and 45 who had either mildly elevated anxiety, moderate depression or high stress.  The women who practiced 90 minutes of yoga twice weekly reported better moods and claimed to have better control over their anxiety.

Promotes a Positive Self-Perception

A pilot study in Brazil which was published in the Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice showed that students who practiced yoga reported feeling better and had more self-control, a better self-perception, increased body awareness, and an improved mind-body connection.  The word yoga actually means “union” referring to the union of the mind and body.

Detox is the first step in the journey to recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the way we approach detox and treat those who are detoxing. Our comfortable environment, encouraging program, and engaging amenities set us apart from other detox centers. Call us today for information:  (844) 325-9168

5 Signs You Need to Go Through Medical Detox

5 Signs You Need to Go Through Medical Detox

Alcohol is a socially accepted drug and someone who has a few drinks a week usually doesn’t consider herself–and indeed is probably not–an alcoholic. It can be difficult to judge at what point drinking becomes a problem. If you are worried that your drinking is a problem, or may become a problem, it’s probably time to stop–at least for awhile and maybe for good.

Quitting alcohol may not be as straightforward as it sounds. Alcohol is highly addictive and withdrawal can be difficult and even dangerous. Withdrawal symptoms may include anxiety, nausea, vomiting, headache, shaking, sweating, irritability, and insomnia. Severe withdrawal, or DTs, may take two days or more to appear and include confusion, high fever, seizures, hallucinations, and heart palpitations. These symptoms can be dangerous and you don’t want to be home alone when they manifest. It’s much safer and less painful to detox in a medical detox facility.

You may be unsure whether medical detox is necessary, given how much you drink. Although everyone reacts differently to withdrawal, symptoms depend heavily on how much you drink and how often. Here are some ways to tell if need medical detox.

You drink heavily and daily. Either by itself is not likely to cause severe withdrawal. For example, if you drink heavily but only on Saturday night, then you are likely to feel terrible on Sunday but you are not likely to have dangerous withdrawal.

Conversely, if you have a drink or two every evening, you are not likely to experience dangerous withdrawal if you decide to give it a rest.

You drink moderately but consistently. Having three or four drinks in the course of a night out is not usually seen as a big deal. Having three or four drinks every evening is cause for concern, and depending on how long the habit has persisted, it might lead to an unpleasant detox.

You live alone. If you feel your drinking is not heavy enough to cause severe withdrawal, you can try it at home, but you shouldn’t try it alone. Alcohol withdrawal can escalate quickly and if you suddenly find yourself shaking and disoriented, it’s better to have someone there who can take you to the emergency room or call 911.

You’ve tried detoxing before. If you have tried detoxing on your own and now you’re trying again, it might be better to choose medical detox. It’s likely that your addiction is worse than you are willing to admit. Also, DTs are more common among people who have detoxed before so you should be in a place where medical care is available.

You have another condition. Detox is mentally and physically stressful. You may feel anxiety, agitation, depression, or disorientation. Your heart may race. All of these symptoms can exacerbate other conditions. If you already suffer from depression or anxiety, even moderate withdrawal can be very difficult. Likewise, if you have a heart condition, the elevated pulse and blood pressure of moderate withdrawal may be an issue. For all of these conditions, it’s best to have medical staff on hand to keep you safe.

Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the approach to detox. Our comfortable environment is designed to support the detox process while helping each client recognize their human dignity in recovery. Detox is the first step in recovery. Start your journey to wellness today by calling us for information:  (844) 325-9168

What Are Triggers?

What Are Triggers?

Addiction, like diabetes or asthma, is a chronic disease.  While you may have finished treatment, you will always be in recovery.  The most important thing you can do to ensure you stay on the path of sobriety is to learn to identify the triggers that could lead to a relapse and guard against them accordingly.  Much like a person who is diagnosed with diabetes must learn to recognize the signs of low blood sugar, you will have to be able to listen to your body and recognize when it is telling you that you are at risk of relapsing.  Triggers can be either external or internal.  The easiest of these to identify and avoid will be the external triggers.  External triggers can include:

People

People who could trigger a relapse can include friends you previously used with, former dealers, or others that may not understand what you are going through.  The best way to avoid people as an external trigger is to surround yourself with people who understand and want to help you maintain your sobriety.

Places

Places that could trigger a relapse could be locations you previously used, former bars that you once hung out at, or even the homes of people you used with.  Avoiding places that may trigger a relapse can be difficult.  It may only take something as innocent as walking past your favorite pub to activate your addiction brain.  Alter your route to and from work in order to avoid passing some of your old hangouts.  Try to plan your routes to avoid any places that may make you want to use again, especially early in your recovery.

Things

Things can be difficult to avoid as some of them can be very common items.  Perhaps seeing an image or scene on tv, a commercial for your favorite alcohol, empty pill bottles, old furniture, even something as simple as a lighter can spark the nostalgia and cause you to reminisce on your past drug or alcohol use.

Situations

There are many situations that may trigger a relapse.  These can be stressful situations at work, listening to certain music, periods of isolation, or watching certain tv shows/movies.  Try to plan out your days and evenings ahead of time so that you can intentionally avoid situations that could trigger a relapse.  Somethings may be unavoidable, like stress at your job, but by communicating with the people you trust you may be able to limit exposure to these situations.

Detox is the first step in the journey to recovery from addiction to drugs and alcohol. The Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the way we approach detox and treat those who are detoxing. Our comfortable environment, encouraging program, and engaging amenities set us apart from other detox centers. Call us today for information:  (844) 325-9168

12-Step Visits to Detox is an Old Tradition

12-Step Visits to Detox is an Old Tradition

Bill D. was A.A. member number three. He was a lawyer and former city councilman. His drinking had gotten so bad that he was hospitalized eight times in six months. He had punched two nurses and had to be restrained in his bed. During his last hospital stay, he was visited by two men, Bob Smith and Bill Wilson, who wanted to try out their new treatment for alcoholism.

They certainly weren’t the first to try to convince Bill D. to stop drinking. He already knew what drinking was doing to him and that if he didn’t want to quit he at least should want to. What made Bob and Bill different from other good samaritans was that they were asking for his help. Years later, Bill D. would say,  “All the other people that talked to me wanted to help ME, and my pride prevented me from listening to them, and caused only resentment on my part, but I felt as if I would be a real stinker if I did not listen to a couple of fellows for a short time, if that would cure THEM.”

Bill D. left the hospital on July 4, 1935 and never drank again. That date has become known as the first A.A. meeting.

This sense of group responsibility is central to the effectiveness of A.A. In its 12 Traditions, number five is “Each group has but one primary purpose–to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.” This isn’t mere proselytism, but rather an integral part of the process. It isn’t only to help the alcoholic, but the recovering alcoholic as well.

In A.A.’s 12 Promises, number five is “No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others.” We typically think of the times we’ve gone “far down the scale” with shame and regret. Using that experience to help others instead of ruminating on it alone is a powerful way to reframe our mistakes. A mistake can be an asset instead of a regret. What’s instructive for the alcoholic is cathartic for the recovering alcoholic because it lets her engage constructively with her past instead of pretending it never happened.

Visiting people in detox is not a favor but a trade. For the person in detox, it begins the process of mutual aid. She learns from someone else’s mistakes and she helps someone else continue his recovery by reaching out.

Gardens Wellness Center is redefining the approach to detox. Our comfortable environment is designed to support the detox process while helping each client recognize their human dignity in recovery. Detox is the first step in recovery. Start your journey to wellness today by calling us for information:  (844) 325-9168